General Lee from ‘Dukes of Hazzard’ Loses Confederate Flag

Jun 24, 2015 at 4:47 pm |
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General Lee and the Dukes of Hazzard

(CBS/Photofest)

Times are a-changin’ and the General Lee is changing with them. The famous 1969 Dodge Charger, as you used to know it, from The Dukes of Hazzard is getting a makeover paint job — sans the Confederate flag.


The decision comes in the wake of the tragic shootings in Charleston, South Carolina. Many retailers since the shooting have reconsidered their association with the Confederate battle flag as an image used in the marketing of any their products. Walmart, Amazon, eBay and other big brands are stripping the symbol from their stores.

But the nation’s distancing from the symbol hasn’t stopped there. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley ordered that the four Confederate flags hanging over the state Capitol in Montgomery be taken down Wednesday morning, and South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley reportedly has took the Confederate flag down from the statehouse in Columbia, so it’s only natural that the General Lee should too relinquish the historical, yet controversial imagery due to associations with racism and white supremacy.

Yahoo Autos asked Warner Bros. Consumer Products, the division of the company that distributes rights for their toys, about what would happen to the General Lee. They responded with this note:

Warner Bros. Consumer Products has one licensee producing die-cast replicas and vehicle model kits featuring the General Lee with the confederate flag on its roof–as it was seen in the TV series. We have elected to cease the licensing of these product categories.

So collectors of die-cast, radio-control, and slot cars in the original General Lee’s likeness can expect newer products to own.

This isn’t the first time that the General Lee has seen discrepancies over its design. In 2012 Warner Bros. defended itself against rumors that it had plans to remove the flag though, oddly, the flag received little to no protests during the airing of the entire television series from 1979-1985. But it’s obvious that the General Lee has now reached a point in history that it can’t quite clear unchanged.

Is this the final blow in the death of the Confederate flag?